Building STORAGE! Part 1

If you remember from one of my first blogs, I spent some time insulating the hull and covering it with cheap flooring in order to stop my condensation problem. Guess what, its coming down. After talking to more boaters, and advancing my boat-building knowledge, I realize my attempt was simply a band-aid.

Over Thanksgiving, Ava and I sailed to Port Townsend to speak with Port Townsend Rigging about pulling our mast and doing a complete inspection of the rig prior to departure in September. After a day setback with the install of the Dickinson heater, we departed a day late and without reliable heat. I still had my portable propane heater, so we were able to warm up down below when were weren’t on watch, but it’s not quite the same as the warm, dry heat of the diesel burner.

What was supposed to be a pleasant 18 kt breeze behind us turned out to be more like 25 dead ahead. As luck would have it, rain showers graced us all day. We were soaked and cold. If we look at the situation optimistically, we did have lots of wind!  In just 7 hrs we had made it to Port Townsend, and tied up to the fuel dock for the night. In the morning after getting our slip, we wandered around the boatyard, chatting up nearly everyone we could find. One of those folks was Andy, one of the employees of Port Townsend Rigging.

Like all boaters, Andy could tell a story. Before long we were all back aboard Cinderella, beers in hand. Andy was telling us about the modifications he made to his boat, and made me aware that I should reconsider what I had done when I insulated the main cabin. He told me about how he added storage behind the settees in his boat. In doing so, he not only added insulation and storage, but also strength to the hull.

This sat in my mind for a while before I finally took the leap. I was going to take everything down and build out cabinets behind the port settee to give Cinderella even more rigidity and precious storage.

This became a larger project (shoscker) than I expected, but the end result is well worth it.

I began by taking all of the flooring down and pulling off all of the stringers I glued to the hull.

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The next steps took the majority of an evening. The port settee was designed to be slept on, not at at, it was much deeper than a normal seat. This allowed me to create plenty of storage behind the future seat-backs, but where would those seat-backs be? It is very challenging to draw a straight line in a boat, even more challenging to take that line and make a template to follow the curvature of a hull. I eventually decided that I needed 19″ for my seat, and the rest would be storage.

I then drew lines up the bulkheads at about 85 degrees to outline where the seat-back would eventually be. From here I was able to glue in my supports and begin cutting cardboard templates.

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Since the access to the storage below the settees did not allow for 19″ seats, I decided the bottom shelf would be 4″ off of the settee (the height of the cushions). I was fortunate I bought an electric carving knife for cutting foam because it works wonders on cardboard templates too. I proceeded to cut out templates for each piece I needed before cutting each piece out of 12mm plywood. At the local lumberyard they have 12mm finished birch plywood that seemed like the perfect choice.

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I kept going until I had each piece cut out an test fitted. Fortunately, you don’t need a perfect fit to the hull here. You actually want to leave about a 1/2″ gap to fill with foam so that the swelling of the wood won’t cause any pressure points on the hull and potentially create stress points.

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The next step was to cut the foam strips to fit the gap. I used polystyrene I had leftover for the initial insulation job, again the carving knife was invaluable. After the foam was glued in place, I made fillets out of thickened epoxy so that the fiberglass would have a gentile arc to adhere to rather than a sharp 90 degree bend. Finally, I was able to lay the fiberglass. I applied three layers with the first halfway between the hull and the plywood and the next two overlapping on either side.

 

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