My Experience with EV – Part 6B Finishing the Motor Mounts

My plan to mount the motor beneath the floor boards took a turn for the worst. The motor wouldn’t fit once connected to the CV joint.

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It was time to rethink my approach and consider Plan B. Plan B was to mount the motor above the propeller shaft and drive it off pulleys. This would place the motor directly below the last rung of the companionway ladder. While the motor would not longer be hidden below the floorboard and a direct drive, I sat back to think about the benefits.

  • The motor is out of the bilge and not not under the risk of being submerged
  • Although I will be losing efficiency due to a belt, I gain the ability to gear the motor to better match the propeller
  • The poles of the motor will no longer be close to the floor and will not cause an electric shock hazard

Not accepting defeat, I changed gears and came up with an idea of how I was going to mount the motor. I was going to fiberglass in vertical stringers between the hull and the floorboard, to the stringers I would mount angle brackets and atop the angle brackets I would bolt the mounting bracket. Simple, right??

At the end of the day, it should look something like this.

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After glassing in the stringers, I painted and epoxied some angle iron I picked up from the local recycle yard for $0.88. Notice in the photo the drive pulley is already on the prop shaft, what a PITA to install.

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After I secured the angle with stainless lag bolts, I drilled the angle to accept the aluminum cross-member which I also picked up at the local recycle yard for $4.00. After a bit of discussion on the forums, I decided to place some rubber pads between the angle iron and the aluminium plate to further prevent galvanic corrosion and allow for some flexing. Thankfully I had an old mouse pad laying around that I was able to cut into strips and place between the dissimilar metals.

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I then drilled holes for the 4 bolts that would be used to align the motor to the propeller shaft. In order to tension the belt I decided to use longer bolts and “float” the motor on nuts much like the leveling of a coinventional refrigerator.

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Here is what the motor looks like fully connected. All that was left was to cut the floorboard to make room for the motor and take her for a test spin!IMG_3733

So simple, sleek, and elegant!

Follow along on My Experience with EV – Part 7 for the wiring details.

 

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